High mediterranean plain

High mediterranean plain

This plain, located on the edge of the tree vegetation and circa 2,400 metres high, forms the most significant and expressive landscape on the high mountainous area of Etna.

Etna Milk Vetch (Astragulus Siculus) particularly dominates this environment, which changes appearance according to height, exposure, nature and substrate. The Etna Milk Vetch grove is represented with various shapes and in association with other typical species of this plain: Barberry (Berberis Aetnensis), Common Juniper (Junipherus Hemisfaerica) and Etna Broom (Genista Aetnensis). Other endemic species live in association with Milk Vetch Root, including Etna Violet, Chickweed (Viola AetnensisCerastium Minus). Found among the sand and gravel, Soapwort (Saponaria Sicula) with elegant roses or Alpine Dock rose bushes (Rumex Aetnensis).

Over the 2,400 metres, only sparse amounts of Alpine Dock and Alpine Ragwort manage to survive, resisting the cold winters and extreme summer droughts.

General thoughts on the Etna’s flora

General thoughts on the Etna’s flora

Mount Etna presents rich, various flora which is distributed in relation to altitude and slope exposure. The area is a unique spectacle of nature where vegetation is characterised by rocky coastline with garigue and brushwood, by caducous evergreen forests and the...

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Low mediterranean plain

Low mediterranean plain

This vegetation plain contains plenty of species influenced by man: the landscape is mainly dominated by citrus groves, vineyards, olive groves, almond groves, pistachio groves and fruit trees. This area also hosts numerous, important natural species, based on their...

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Mountainous mediterranean plain

Mountainous mediterranean plain

At a height of 1,000 to 1,500 metres, vegetation is characterised by groves of Corsican Pine (Pinus Laricio), Silver Birch (Betula Aetnensis), Beech (Fagus Selvatica) and Poplar (Populus Tremula). The same climatic zone of oak trees includes widespread Chestnut groves...

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